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Notes: Généalogie MORIN Roots

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Matches 801 to 1,000 of 3,852

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 #   Notes   Linked to 
801 Dyer LEYDON, Aloisia (I4116)
 
802 Dyer LEYDON, Elizabeth (I4115)
 
803 Dyer LEYDON, Anne (I4112)
 
804 Dyer LEYDON, James (I4111)
 
805 Dyer LEYDON, Mary (I4107)
 
806 Dyer CONNORS, Mary Jane (I4105)
 
807 Dyer CONNORS, Bernard (I4104)
 
808 Dyer CONNORS, David (I4103)
 
809 Dyer CONNORS, Thomas (I4102)
 
810 Dyer CONNORS, Isabella (I4101)
 
811 Dyer CONNORS, Patrick (I4100)
 
812 Dyer CONNORS, Michael (I4099)
 
813 Dyer CONNORS, John (I4098)
 
814 Dyer MURPHY, Isabel (I4097)
 
815 Dyer CONNORS, Michael (I4095)
 
816 Dyer CONNORS, Elizabeth Jane (I4094)
 
817 Dyer CONNORS, Catherine Esther (I4093)
 
818 Dyer MACDONALD, Sherwood (I4092)
 
819 Dyer MCLEAN, Jean (I4091)
 
820 Dyer MCLEAN, Muriel (I4090)
 
821 Dyer MCLEAN, John Reginald (I4089)
 
822 Dyer MCLEAN, Helen Ernestine (I4088)
 
823 Dyer MACDONALD, Alexander (I4087)
 
824 Dyer CONNORS, Richard (I4086)
 
825 Dyer CONNORS, Thomas (I4085)
 
826 Dyer NELSON, Milton Harold Maclean (I4083)
 
827 Dyer NELSON, Dorothy Ella (I4082)
 
828 Dyer NELSON, Willard Robert (I4081)
 
829 Dyer NELSON, Ernest Albert (I4080)
 
830 Dyer MACDONALD, James (I4078)
 
831 Dyer BOYLE, Marcella Cecelia (I4075)
 
832 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I4074)
 
833 Dyer BOYLE, Kathlene Margaret (I4073)
 
834 Dyer CONNORS, Bridget Ann (I4071)
 
835 Dyer CONNORS, Mary E. (I4070)
 
836 Dyer MACDONALD, Marcella (I4069)
 
837 Dyer BOYLE, Bridget (I4068)
 
838 Dyer CONNORS, Ella Harriette (I4066)
 
839 Dyer CONNORS, Laura Mary (I4065)
 
840 Dyer STROPLE, Sarah Sophia (I4064)
 
841 Dyer CONNORS, Margaret (I4063)
 
842 Dyer CONNORS, Kate (I4062)
 
843 Dyer CONNORS, Louise (I4061)
 
844 Dyer CONNORS, Esther Anne (I4058)
 
845 Dyer CONNORS, John (I4057)
 
846 Dyer CONNORS, Matthew (I4056)
 
847 Dyer CONNORS, Mary Elizabeth (I4055)
 
848 Dyer FITZGERALD, Jane (I4028)
 
849 Dyer CHISHOLM, Alexander (I4013)
 
850 Dyer HYDE, Mary (I4012)
 
851 Dyer HANEY, Mary Rebecca (I4009)
 
852 Dyer CARROLL, Mary C. (I4008)
 
853 Dyer CONNORS, Sarah (I4007)
 
854 Dyer CONNORS, Mary (I4006)
 
855 Dyer CONNORS, Donald (I4005)
 
856 Dyer CONNORS, Richard (I4004)
 
857 Dyer CONNORS, William (I4003)
 
858 Dyer CONNORS, Thomas (I4002)
 
859 Earl of Bedford. DE BEAUMONT, Hugh (I6503)
 
860 Earl of Surrey
Lewes Castle was built by William de Warenne at the end of the eleventhcentury. After the Norman invasion in 1066 William de Warenne was givenland in Sussex, Surrey, and Norfolk. He built three castles but hischief residence was at Lewes. Lewes Castle was built by William deWarenne soon after the Norman invasion. Most experts say it wasoriginally made of wood but others insist it was flint. It was probablyin the early 12th century that a sturdy stone castle was erected.
Some sources say he died at Pevensey.
Ruth Cobb, "'Travellers to the Town," London: The Epworth Press, 1953,pp. 25-26:
The commander of this part of Sussex [around Lewes] appointed by Williamthe Conqueror was one William de Warenne, who had long been high in theConqueror's favour, having distinguished himself as a warrior in France.A contemporary account says
William de Warenne his own squadron led,
And well sat the helmet on so knightly a head.
....The land over which William de Warenne was given control consistedof the Burgh and the entire Rape of Lewes--about a sixteenth of Sussex.He was also given the land at Castle Acre in Norfolk and at Reigate inSurrey. Later he was to be created Earl of Surrey as a reward for helpthat he had given in quelling an insurrection of some rebelliousbarons.
[on p. 30 Cobb refers to him as "dark-haired".]
p. 31: Although it is now a ruin, the castle built by William de Warennein the centre [of Lewes]--and from where his descendants were to ruleuntil the end of the [14th] century--still seems to dominate the place.The entrance is off the High Street where, in medieval days, a MarketCross once stood. Where there was once a drawbridge, there is now apermanent causeway, and the name 'Castle Ditch' is still in use for thepiece of moat that protected it on one side. It is now a narrowthoroughfare.
The entrance arch built by William de Warenne still stands, but in frontof it is a magnificent Barbican, one of the finest in England, built inthe [14th] century by a later de Warenne. To the left, on its highmound, stands about half of the old keep with two of the towers thatwere added, still intact, and with windows of a much later date. Fromthe keep, there is a magnificent view down the valley over which the seaonce flowed when the castle guarded a port, as well as the heights ofthe downs on either side.
See notes on his wife Gundrada for Cobb's commentary on his andGundrada's founding of the Priory at Southover after visiting themonastery at Cluny.
Cobb, p. 54: In the time of William de Warenne, the Priory at Southover,which he had built, must have needed large supplies of food--not onlyfor the members of the community, but also for the many travellers whostayed in the guest house. The low-lying land nearby was not suitablefor the growing of corn; a grange or farm elsewhere was a necessity, soone was built on the land that William de Warenne had given to thePriory at Swanborough. The charter says that 'he gave to God and theAbbot of Cluny, five hides and a half of land, and also free fishing inthe waters'. This must have been in 1080, for by then the building ofthe grange had been completed. It is possible that some of the greatbeams in the barn which are still to be seen at the present farm atSwanborough, may have been put up by the monks who worked there so longago.

Ancient Lineage of Magna Carta Baron: William de Warenne
William the Conqueror was a third or fourth generation Viking whoseancestor was reportedly from Honefoss in what is now Norway, near theOslofjord. The de Vermandois connection relates to one of the smallpost-Carolingian Frankish kingdoms along the northern border ofpresent-day France. Princesses from the Frankish kingdom married deWarennes on at least two occasions. Perhaps this was done to placate thefierce Vikings and to enlist their help for defensive purposes. Thisstrategy was used by the King of France who arranged similar marriagesfor his daughters in 911 when he recognized the Duchy of Normandy underRollo aka Rolf or Hrolf, an altogether evil king. [1]
The House of Warren can be traced to Hugh of Normandy, born 990, laterordained Bishop of Contances. He married a sister of Gunnora, the wifeof Richard I, Duke of Normandy. Rodulf, son to Hugh, a benefactor to theAbbey of La Trinite du Mont, died c1050. He married first Beatrix andsecondly Emma. Emma became the mother of his son William created Countde Warenne of Normandy and later first Earl of Surrey. [2]
William de Warenne, son of Rodulf, was born in Normandy and accompaniedWilliam the Conqueror to England in 1066. At the Battle of Hastings, hecommanded a detachment and was rewarded with estates and manors inNorfolk becoming the first Earl of Surrey. Before 1070, William deWarenne married Gundred, a lady with disputed parentage since manyscholars disbelieve she was the daughter of the Conqueror. Some contendshe was the Duke's daughter as proven by her tombstone at St. John'sChurch, Southover, Lewes: "Within this Pew stands the tombstone ofGundrad, daughter of William the Conqueror, and wife of William, theFirst Earl of Warren, which having been deposited over her remains inthe Chapter-House of Lewes Priory and lately discovered in IffieldChurch, was removed to this place at the expense of William Burrell Esq.in 1775 A.D. [3]
Gundred died in childbirth at Castle Acre May 27, 1085, and was buriedin the Priory of Lewes in County Sussex. Four of her children matured:William Son & Heir, Reginald, Gundred, and Edith. William, now Earl ofSurrey, rebuilt, enlarged, and strengthened Lewes Castle which is nowused as the museum of Sussex Archaeological Society. William de Warennefounded Cluniac Priory in 1078, now a ruin, and endowed the chapterhouse of the Priory. He married secondly a daughter of William, sisterof Richard Guet of Montmirail, and died June 24, 1088, from woundsreceived at the siege of Pevensey. He is buried near Ely Cathedral inEast Anglia. [4] 
DE WARENNE, William I Earl of Surrey (I5264)
 
861 Earl of Warren and 2nd Earl of Surrey. Fought at Tenchefrai, 1106, forHenry I DE WARENNE, Ada (I9)
 
862 EAST GRANBY the evolution of a Connecticut town
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=0fbfb94b-752f-48cf-ac75-22e807c18665&tid=19079505&pid=870980727

John and Anna (Bancroft) Griffin
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=f3ebd39e-0b0b-4b60-99b0-5e121059aba8&tid=19079505&pid=870980727

Business & Land Aquisition
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=d429b2dd-c384-4563-b123-67205e88887a&tid=19079505&pid=870980727

Arrival of John Griffin from Wales
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=b2dd8016-c0d6-48a4-ad1b-a1486e50a8a4&tid=19079505&pid=870980727

CONNECTICUT PROBATE RECORDS
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=5478e2bb-42d3-42ed-b10e-cb278aec24d9&tid=19079505&pid=870980727

History of John Griffin
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=2d1d770c-bf18-4041-b99f-f7325720d93e&tid=19079505&pid=870980727 
GRIFFIN, John (I8101)
 
863 Ebenezer II died when ten years old. PARKER, Ebeneezer II (I42862)
 
864 écuyer, Sr de Valence et dee Bouillons ( -Paris, <1571), notaire etsecrétaire du roi, secrétaire de la reine, superintendant des financesen Toscane et Siennois, amodiateur du duché de Chevreuse et desVaux-de-Cernay, sgr de Valence et des Boullons près Dampierre BAILLON, Adam s. de valence (I3326)
 
865 edited 'The Joy of Acting-A Primer for Actors. BRAGDON, 'Casey' Helen Cushman (I840)
 
866 EDUCATION: Cornwall Sch., Massachusettes. Served in the US Navy in the Tripoli expedition and during the War of 1812. Rebelled and tried to establish himself as an independent ruler, 3rd August 1824. Captured and taken to Honolulu as a state prisoner.

He d. from influenza, at Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii, 3rd May 1826, having had issue, an only daughter.

He was born in the late 1790s with the name Humehume. His father was King Kaumuali?i, ruler of the islands of Kaua?i and Ni?ihau. Although some sources say his mother was one of the king's royal wives,[1] most say his mother was a commoner, of which not much is known.[2] This might explain an important event that happened when he was a young boy. In January 1804 an American trading ship Hazard arrived at Kaua?i. Since the landing of Captain James Cook on January 1778, the port of Waimea had been a known stop for European and American ships in the Pacific.[3] King Kaumuali?i paid Captain James Rowan of the American trading ship Hazard to take his son aboard, ostensibly to get an education in America. A more believable theory is that Kaumuali?i's Queen did not want any competition for the future throne with her own son who had the better royal pedigree.[4] His father suggested the name "George" after the Prince of Wales at the time (later George IV of the United Kingdom).[5]

----------------------------------------------------------------

H.H. Prince George P. Kaumu-alii Hume-hume (s/o Queen Kawalu), educ. Cornwall Sch., Massachusettes. Served in the US Navy in the Tripoli expedition and during the War of 1812. Rebelled and tried to establish himself as an independent ruler, 3rd August 1824. Captured and taken to Honolulu as a state prisoner. Married at Honolulu, Oahu, 1823, Betty, eldest daughter of Isaac Davis. He d. from influenza, at Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii, 3rd May 1826, having had issue, an only daughter: H.H. Princess Harriet Ka-wahini Kipi. b. in the mountains of Kauai, August 1824. m. at Iton, 28th March 1837, John Meek, Jnr. She d. 3rd September 1843. 
KAUMUALII, H.H. Prince George Humehume (George Tamoree) (I42565)
 
867 Edward Abnel Keli?iahonui Pi?ikoi Kaw?nanakoa

H.R.H. Prince Edward Abel Keli'iahonui Kawananakoa. b. 13th May 1869, educ. Royal Sch., and Oahu Coll., Honolulu, Hawaii; St. Matthew's Episcopalian Sch. for Boys, San Mateo, California, USA. Adopted by Queen Kapi'olani. Granted the title of Prince and style of His Royal Highness, 1883. Rcvd: GC of the Order of Kapi'olani (12.2.1883) 
KELIIAHONUI, Edward (HRH Prince Keliiahonui) (I42096)
 
868 Edward Burroughs, Sea Captain
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=e9ccc734-e25e-4787-8e94-bcbe48334525&tid=19079505&pid=870969408 
BURROUGHS, Edward (I8059)
 
869 Edward Fuller was the son of Robert and Sara (Dunkhorn) Fuller ofRedenhall, Norfolk, England. Some accounts give his mother as Francis,but Francis appears to be Robert Fuller's second wife. Robert's firstwife Sara was buried 1 July 1584, and thus would have been the mother ofEdward Fuller. Edward Fuller's brother Samuel Fuller also came toAmerica on the Mayflower. Edward Fuller married, and moved to Leyden,Holland for a short time before coming to America. The name of his wifeis not known. James Savage, in his "Genealogical Dictionary of theFirst Settlers of New England" says Edward Fuller's wife was named Ann.However, this appears to have simply been a typographical error.Samuel and Edward Fuller were one set of brothers to come on theMayflower, but another set of brothers were John and Edward Tilley.Edward Tilley had a wife named Ann, not Edward Fuller. BIOGRAPHICALSUMMARY:
Edward Fuller, his wife, and his son Samuel came to America on theMayflower. They had lived in Leyden, Holland for a short period oftime, but originally came from Redenhall, Norfolk, England. EdwardFuller's father was a butcher by trade, and his brother Samuel was adoctor and deacon. Edward's occupation, however, remains unknown. Heand his wife both died the first winter. 
FULLER, Edward (I2838)
 
870 Edward was reported as being 83 and a magistrate. Family F713
 
871 Eight men and one woman and a small child left Lynn, Mass. in 1640 tosettle a new colony. They settled in Southampton and Thomas built thefirst English house on Long Island in 1648 which is still there SAYRE, Thomas (I1961)
 
872 either 1893 or 1883 BOSS, Laura Helen (I1648)
 
873 either murdered by Macbeth or killed in battle against him OF SCOTLAND, King Duncan I (I5286)
 
874 Eleanor brought the lordship of Brecon to this marriage. DE BRAOSE, Eleanor (I6186)
 
875 elected Ruling Elder of his church COBB, Elder Henry (I1472)
 
876 Elfrida is said to have had an adulterous affair with King Edward whilebeing still married to Ethelwald, and some sources allege that Ethelwaldwas murdered on Edgar's orders. Queen Elfrida (I5274)
 
877 Elisha was a very industrious and productive man. He was a buildingcontractor for both the Guysborough and Antigonish court houses. Heresided in the house on the hill where John Stewart now lives [1996].Elisha's Will states that he had 100 acres of land--75 acres forfarming, and 25 acres (lying near the sea shore in a NE direction belowthe public road), which was to be sold at auction with proceeds goingequally to the six married daughters [compare 1871 census; Elisha islisted with 179 acres]. RANDALL, Elisha Matthew (I3886)
 
878 Elizabeth was a young widow. A woman, presumably Michaels motherwaslisted on the 1784 muster roll HOLLAND, Elizabeth (I7042)
 
879 Elle a fait ses études de médecine avec son oncle et cousin. FORTIER, Marie Cédulie (I911)
 
880 elle est veuve d'un conseiller du roi "en son trésor à Paris" Family F1902
 
881 Elle fonda le monastère de Mons. DE LOMMOIS, Wautrude (I5706)
 
882 Elle fonde une communauté de nonnes en l'honneur de Saint-Laurent où onl'appelle : 'Oda comitissa Pippin regis Italiae ex filia neptis'. Dansune charte de l'évêque d'Halberstadt en 1121, on trouve également lamention : 'comitissa Oda regia stirpe orta'. BILLUNG, Oda (I4596)
 
883 Elle pourrait descendre de Radbod, roi de Frise au VIème siècle. DE FRISE (I5960)
 
884 EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE:
From: Clancy [mailto:XXXXXXXXXX] Sent: Saturday, February 11, 2006 10:05 AM To: dkekoolani@vantagepoint.tv Subject: KEKOOLANI WEBSITE
Dear Sir:
Thank you for your web site. It is very helpful.
Information on your website enabled me to verify that I am a descendant of Alexander Adams and Charlotte Oili Harbottle via Sarah Isaac Akamu Adams > Barbara Kamealani Gray > Myra Kealoha Keau Spalding > Dean Spalding Frazier.
Thank you again.
Sincerely,
xxxxxxxx (See archives - Kekoolani Family Library #2049)
EMAIL RECORD (Kekoolani Catalog #)
2049.001 Dean Frazier Clancey 
GREY (GRAY), Alexander (I40607)
 
885 EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE:
From: Clancy [mailto:XXXXXXXXXX] Sent: Saturday, February 11, 2006 10:05 AM To: dkekoolani@vantagepoint.tv Subject: KEKOOLANI WEBSITE
Dear Sir:
Thank you for your web site. It is very helpful.
Information on your website enabled me to verify that I am a descendant of Alexander Adams and Charlotte Oili Harbottle via Sarah Isaac Akamu Adams > Barbara Kamealani Gray > Myra Kealoha Keau Spalding > Dean Spalding Frazier.
Thank you again.
Sincerely,
xxxxxxxx (See archives - Kekoolani Family Library #2049)
EMAIL RECORD (Kekoolani Catalog #)
2049.001 Dean Frazier Clancey 
GREY (GRAY), Barbara Kamealani (I40622)
 
886 EMAIL CORRESPONDENCE:
From: Clancy [mailto:XXXXXXXXXX] Sent: Saturday, February 11, 2006 10:05 AM To: dkekoolani@vantagepoint.tv Subject: KEKOOLANI WEBSITE
Dear Sir:
Thank you for your web site. It is very helpful.
Information on your website enabled me to verify that I am a descendant of Alexander Adams and Charlotte Oili Harbottle via Sarah Isaac Akamu Adams > Barbara Kamealani Gray > Myra Kealoha Keau Spalding > Dean Spalding Frazier.
Thank you again.
Sincerely,
xxxxxxxx (See archives - Kekoolani Family Library #2049)
EMAIL RECORD (Kekoolani Catalog #)
2049.001 Dean Frazier Clancey 
GREY (GRAY), George (I40682)
 
887 Email information given to Dean P. Kekoolani by Darlene Kekoolani Simmons Davis regarding her grandfather Theodore Simmons and grandmother Pearl Kekoolani Simmons. Source (S491)
 
888 embarks for the UK CORBETT, Lt. Mark Alphonsus (I788)
 
889 emigrated aboard the same ship as John Corbett and his 2 brothers O'BRIEN, James (I1061)
 
890 Emigrated fm Ireland to Chester Co., PA WAYNE, Captain Anthony (I1846)
 
891 Emigrated from Wales (via a few months in NYC) to Toronto HUGHES, Craig Parry (I766)
 
892 Emigrated to Canada from Inniskillin, Northern Ireland to York thenIngaldsby on the shore of Lake Kashnainogawigamog, Haliburton Co., ON ANDERSON, Alexander (I1627)
 
893 Emissaire du Roi Sigfried en 782. Profession : 3ème Roi de Haithabu. DE JUTLAND, Halvdan (I5858)
 
894 Emma was given hanai to her aunt Grace and her husband Dr. Rooke by her natural parents.

Upon the death of her son Prince Albert Leiopapa a Kamehameha, Queen Emma took the name "Kaleleokalani" - the flight of the chief, the following year, upon the death of her husband King Kamehameha IV, she changed it to "Kaleleonalani" - the flight of the chiefs (plural) 
KALELEONALANI, H.M. Queen Emma Na'ea (Queen Consort of Hawaii) (I42142)
 
895 Emmené en captivité à Byzance en 585, il s'y marie à une dignitaire del'Empire in Jacques Saillot. DE WISIGOTHIE, Athanagilde (I5637)
 
896 Emperor Conrad I had designated him as his successor and this wassupported by the Saxon and Franconian nobility. Although he was thefirst non-Frank ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, he nevertheless adoptedFrankish customs, dress and manners. As he regarded the support of thenobility as sufficient for his position, he refused to be crowned by thebishops. Also, as Duke of Saxony he had shown his independence fromEmperor and Church; yet, as Emperor himself, he grew closer to thechurch. The most serious problem of his reign was the independence ofthe higher nobility. This had been caused by the disintegration ofmonarchical powers in the preceeding fifty years. He re-establishedimperial control over Suabia, Lotharingia and Bavaria. However, ingeneral he allowed the dukes a free hand within their own territories.Several times after 925 he raided the territories of his uncivilizedneighbours, the Slavic Wends and the Hungarian Magyars, takingBrandenburg from the Wends and, in 933, defeating the Magyars in battle.Then in the conquered lands he built fortified cities as militarystrongholds. His rule restored much of the power and prestige of themonarchy so that, before he died, he obtained the recognition of hisson, Otto, as his successor. Henri I 'The Fowler' Holy Roman Emperor (I4302)
 
897 emplacement sur lequel les freres Gagnon (Mathurin, Pierre et Jean)construisent une longue maison en bois, a la fois magasin et logement.Elle brulera en 1686. GAGNON, Jean (I3393)
 
898 emplacement sur lequel les freres Gagnon (Mathurin, Pierre et Jean)construisent une longue maison en bois, a la fois magasin et logement.Elle brulera en 1686. GAGNON, Mathurin (I2292)
 
899 Encyclopedia Britannica Online, article titled 'Henry the YoungKing:''also called HENRY FITZHENRY, second son of King Henry II of EnglandbyEleanor of Aquitaine; he was regarded, after the death of hiselderbrother, William, in 1156, as his father's successor inEngland,Normandy, and Anjou. 'In 1158 Henry, only three years of age,was betrothed to Margaret,daughter of Louis VII of France and his secondwife, on condition thatMargaret's dowry would be the Vexin, the borderregion betweenNormandy (then held by England) and France. Henry II tookadvantage ofPope Alexander III's political difficulties to secure thePope'spermission for the children to be married in 1160. On June 14,1170,the young Henry was crowned king (theoretically to rule inassociationwith his father) at Westminster by Archbishop Roger of York.York'sofficiation, usurping a prerogative of the archbishop ofCanterbury,exacerbated the dispute between the latter, namely, ThomasBecket, andHenry II, which ended with Becket's murder six months later.Crownedagain on Aug. 27, 1172 (this time with Margaret), the YoungKingreceived no share of his father's power. (He was neverthelesscalledby contemporaries and by certain later chroniclers King HenryIII.) 'With his mother and his brothers Richard (the future Richard I)andGeoffrey, he nearly overthrew Henry II in 1173. Forgiven forthisrevolt, he intrigued further against his father with Louis VII.In1182-83 he waged war against Richard over Poitou, and he waspreparingto fight Richard again when he died in France of dysentery.'The Young King was so popular that the people of Le Mans andRouenalmost went to war for the custody of his body, and in hismother'shereditary lands he was immortalized in the 'Lament for theYoungKing' by the troubadour Bertran de Born.' PLANTAGENET, King Henry III of England (I6389)
 
900 Engeltrude pour Pierre Riché. Richeut ou Engeltrude (I5914)
 
901 England and Wales Death Registration Index 1837-2007 LAMB, Hubert (I68894)
 
902 English sea captain and trader who worked route between Tahiti and Hawaii with stays in each place between 1840 to 1850 period. BAKER, Capt. Adam C. (I44012)
 
903 enroled in the Navy in the War of independence. He was consequentlydisowned by the Society of Friends. WAYNE, Jacob (I1006)
 
904 enseigne COUILLARD, Charles-Marie de Beaumont (I3620)
 
905 enterre sous l'eglise St. Thomas FOURNIER, Guillaume (I2245)
 
906 Epicier et apothicaire à Paris puis en Acadie à Port-Royal en 1606-1607et 1611-1613, puis à Québec en 1617. HÉBERT, Louis (I2170)
 
907 Epitaph reads:
'Come youth behold, improve your day
For many years soon fly away.
Make God your friend, prepare to die,
For you must lay as low as I.' 
COBB, Nathan (I1466)
 
908 Epouse une veuve franque déjà mère de deux enfants. Profession : Roid'East-Anglie de 599 à 624. D'EAST-ANGLIE, Raedwald (I5630)
 
909 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1090)
 
910 est admis a MORIN, Major Joseph Athanase ED (I4)
 
911 est admis au 5FDS et ensuite envoye du 5FDS au 5CCS MORIN, Major Joseph Athanase ED (I4)
 
912 est affecte au Quartier General de la 3e Division Canadienne MORIN, Major Joseph Athanase ED (I4)
 
913 est élu en l'élection de Paris DE MARLE, Claude (I3343)
 
914 est embarqué pour l'Angleterre MORIN, Major Joseph Athanase ED (I4)
 
915 est le premier enfant blanc né en Nouvelle-France, croit-on. DESPORTES, Hélène (I2250)
 
916 est libere de l' MORIN, Major Joseph Athanase ED (I4)
 
917 est maintenu dans sa noblesse DE MARLE, Jehan (I3347)
 
918 est orpheline en bas âge. Elle demeure avec son oncle et tuteur,Guillaume Couillard. HÉBERT, Françoise (I2246)
 
919 est venu en Nouvelle-France, vers l'âge de 21 ans. La première mention desa présence à Québec est de 1669, lorsqu'il achète une habitation sur larivière Saint-Charles. En 1675, il construit la petite maison deFrançois Jacquet (qui subsiste encore aujourd'hui, coin des ruesSaint-Louis et Desjardins) en échange d'une propriété sur la rivièreSaint-Charles.
Ses principales réalisations débutent vers 1680 lorsqu'il s'occupe, de1680 à 1690, des chantiers de la maison des Jésuites près du port deQuébec (1684), une des mieux situées de la basse-ville, de la maisonComporté [Gaultier] (1685), de la maison Pachot [Viennay-Pachot] (1686)sise à la Place Royale consacrée la même année .En 1688 il participe àla réfection du monastère des Ursulines, construit le clocher del'église appelée Notre-Dame-de-la-Victoire en 1690 et celui de lacathédrale. Le dessin qui accompagne le marché Comporté témoigne del'importance du colombage à l'époque et révèle sa maîtrise du métiermalgré des moyens simples et traditionnels. Son apport à la réalisationde l'Hôtel-Dieu (1691) et du château Saint-Louis (1692) marque l'apogéede sa carrière.
Ménager était illettré et ne pouvaît même signer son nom. 
MÉNAGE, Pierre (I3232)
 
920 Est-ce le même que Anselm de HASPENGAU, mort à Roncevaux ? Profession :Comte DE HASPENGAU, Ingramm ou Ingerman (I5821)
 
921 était soldat, greffier, notaire, secrétaire du gouverneur JEAN De LAUSONpuis de Charles DE LAUSON de Charny, juge-prevot de la cote de Beaupré,lieutenant particulier de la Sénéchaussée et commis du magasin de laCompagnie de la Nouvelle-France membre du premier Conseil de la colonie,premier conseiller au Conseil souverain, agent de la Ferme du roi.Defamille noble originaire d'ltalie, mais sans fortune. intelligent ettravailleur, Louis Rouer de Villeray avait tout juste dépassé lavingtaine quand il débarqua au Canada. en 1650 ou 1651. A son arrivée,il fut soldat à Québec, puis à Trois-rivières, ou il fut remarqué parPierre Boucher', qui en fit son homme de confiance en le constituant,par un acte signé devant Séverin Ameau le 20 Octobre 1653, "son procurergénéral et spécial [...] pour accomplir les mémoires des marchandisesque le dit Sieur Boucher désire faire venir aux dites Trois-rivières ".L'année suivante, Rouer revint à Québec, où le gouverneurJean de Lauson se l'attacha comme secrétaire. Son fils, Charles, lecontinua dans cette charge. Il fut en même temps notaire, de 1653 à1657, et commis-greffier en la juridiction de Québec. Il remplit aussila fonction. assez peu onéreuse a cette époque, de juge-Prévot de lacote de Beaupré. considérablement sa situation. Son beau-père, Charles SEVESTRE, étantmort deux mois auparavant, il hérita d'une concession d'un arpent defront par dix de profondeur entre la Grande Allée et le fleuve, avecdroit de pêche. Le gouverneur Louis D'Ailleboust lui donna aussi lasuccession de Charles Sevestre dans les deux charges de lieutenantparticulier de la Sénéchaussée et de commis du magasin de la Compagniede la Nouvelle-France a Québec.difficultés a Villeray. Quand il fut, peu après, élu au Conseil de latraite, on l'accusa d'occuper cette charge illicitement, puisqu'iln'avait pas encore réglé les comptes de Charles Sevestre. Les plaintescontre Villeray parvinrent a la cour et, par un édit royal daté du 13mai 1659, il fut démis de ses fonctions et reçut l'ordre d'aller enFrance, à l'automne, se disculper et présenter les comptes de CharlesSevestre avec pièces justificatives. De retour le printemps suivant. ilfut rétabli dans sa charge. Mais comme le Conseil de la traitepersistait à le tenir responsable des sommes dépensées par son beau-pèresur la seule autorité du gouverneur du temps, Villeray, qui avaitcependant l'appui du gouverneur de Voyer d'Argenson, dut repasser enFrance en 1660 et en 1662 pour défendre sa cause.Nouvelle-France lui confirma la concession des terres héritées de sonbeau-père, lui accorda les trois ou quatre arpents dont la Possessionlui était contestée, et donna au tout la désignation de fief Villeray.Il reçut, la même année, une promotion d'importance. Quand, le 18Septembre 1663, le gouverneur de Saffray de Mezy et Mgr de Laval'choisirent les cinq membres qui devaient constituer avec eux-mêmes leConseil souverain, Villeray fut le premier nommé. A partir de ce moment,Rouer de Villeray eut un rôle de premier plan à jouer dans la directiondes affaires judiciaires et administratives de la colonie. Un despremiers actes du Conseil souverain fut dirigé contre l'avocat JEANPÉRONNE Dumesnil, officier supérieur que la Compagnie de la NouvelleFrance avait envoyé dans la colonie, en 1660, en qualité de contrôleurgénéral, Intendant des Cent-Associes et juge souverain: ses accusationset ses inquisitions lui avaient aliéné tous les hommes en place.Villeray et JEAN Bourdon reçurent mission de saisir les documents dontDumesnil s'était empare et de le chasser de sa maison, qui appartenaita la colonie. Ils accomplirent leur tâche avec l'assistance d'unedizaine de soldats. gouverneur et l'évêque. Après que le conseil se fut rangé du coté del'évêque sur la question des dîmes, Mezy, par son ordonnance du 13février 1664, suspendit Rouer de Villeray, Ruette d'Auteuil et leprocureur général Bourdon: il les accusait d'usurper l'autorité dugouverneur et de fomenter la sédition de concert avec l'évêque. Ilrevint sur sa décision deux mois plus tard, mais de nouvellesdissensions furent créées à l'occasion de l'élection d'un syndic deshabitants. Une réunion de citoyens avait été convoquée par le gouverneurseul pour choisir le syndic, la conseillers protestèrent. Furieux deleur opposition, le gouverneur démit de leurs fonctions, le 19 Septembre1664, Pourdon. Villeray, d'Auteuil et JEAN JUCHEREAU DE LA FERTÉ:Villeray était absent, s'étant embarque pour la France le 30 aoûtprécédent. Le 24 Septembre, le gouverneur nommait trois nouveauxconseillers, mais sans l'assentiment, obligatoire, de l'évêque. Dans unmémoire présenté au roi. Villeray accusa Mezy d'être jaloux des pouvoirsdu conseil et d'être fâché de n'avoir pas obtenu une augmentation de sontraitement. La mort de Mezy empêcha seule sa destitution. En France,Villeray rencontra probablement TALON, nouvellement nommé intendant dela Nouvelle-France. Il obtint que celui-ci intercédat auprès du ministrepour que Villeray et quelques autres Canadiens puissent charger sur unnavire de la Compagnie des Indes occidentales les provisions achetésdans la métropole. C'est aussi probablement avec l'intendant qu'ilrevint a Québec a l'été de 1665. Le 6 Décembre 1666. il reçut a nouveaula charge de premier conseiller, cette fois de Prouville de Tracy.Jusqu'à ce moment, Villeray avait passe pour être complètement dévoue al'évêque et aux Jésuites. Mais il semble que, peu après, son attachementa Talon fut le plus fort. Lorsque, le 10 Novembre 1668 l'Intendantproposa un arrêt permettant la vente de l'eau-de-vie aux sauvages.Villeray vota en faveur de la mesure. C'était un affront à l'évêque:Villeray n'avait-il pas été élu plus tôt marguillier de la paroisse deQuébec '! Sa relations avec l'évêque continuèrent portant d'être bonnes.Et Talon, qui le protégeait, lui accorda le poste de receveur de l'impôtde dix pour cent sur les marchandises sèches arrivant au Canada. ROUER, Louis de Villeray (I2493)
 
922 Ethelswitha turned to religion in 901 after the death of King Alfred andbecame a nun at St-Mary's Abbey, Winchester. St. Ethelswitha (I5280)
 
923 Étudia au petit séminaire de Québec de 1815 à 1822, puis fut journalisteau Canadien. Entreprit, en 1823, l'apprentissage du droit auprès deDenis-Benjamin Viger, à Montréal, où il fonda la Minerve, en 1826;vendit son journal à Ludger Duvernay l'année suivante. Admis au barreauen 1828.

Exerça la profession d'avocat à Montréal jusqu'en 1836, puis à Québec.Collabora à la Minerve.

Élu député de Bellechasse en 1830; appuya le parti patriote; démissionnale 18 décembre 1833. Réélu à une élection partielle le 26 janvier 1834;envoyé en Angleterre par l'Assemblée, avec Denis-Benjamin Viger, pourprésenter et défendre les Quatre-vingt-douze Résolutions. Réélu en 1834.Modéré jusqu'en 1836, puis radical; fut le chef de la rébellion de 1837à Québec. Conserva son siège jusqu'à la suspension de la constitution,le 27 mars 1838. Emprisonné pour haute trahison le 28 octobre 1839, futlibéré peu après. Élu dans Nicolet en 1841; antiunioniste, fit partie dugroupe canadien-français. Démissionna comme député le 7 janvier 1842,puis devint juge le 11; abandonna cette charge et fut élu député deSaguenay à une élection partielle le 28 novembre 1842. Membre duministère Baldwin-La Fontaine: conseiller exécutif du 13 octobre 1842jusqu'à sa démission le 27 novembre 1843; à titre de commissaire desTerres de la couronne du 13 octobre 1842 au 11 décembre 1843, fondaVal-Morin, Sainte-Adèle et Morin-Heights. Réélu dans Saguenay et éludans Bellechasse en 1844; opta pour Bellechasse le 13 décembre 1844; fitpartie du groupe canadien-français; élu orateur suppléant de l'Assembléele 13 avril 1846, le demeura jusqu'au 19 mai; refusa, le 10 août 1846,l'offre de se joindre au Conseil exécutif. Réélu député en 1848; fitpartie à nouveau du groupe canadien-français; élu orateur de la Chambrele 25 février 1848, conserva cette fonction jusqu'au 27 octobre 1851.Élu dans Terrebonne en 1851; réformiste. Forma un ministère avec FrancisHincks: secrétaire provincial du 28 octobre 1851 au 30 août 1853 etcommissaire des Terres de la couronne du 31 août 1853 au 10 septembre1854. Défait dans Terrebonne, puis élu sans opposition dans lescirconscriptions unies de Chicoutimi et Tadoussac en 1854; réformiste.Constitua un ministère avec Allan Napier MacNab: commissaire des Terresde la couronne du 11 septembre 1854 au 26 janvier 1855, date à laquelleil démissionna comme ministre pour raison de santé.

Son siège de député fut déclaré vacant le 27 en raison de sa nominationà titre de juge de la Cour supérieure.

Nommé conseiller de la reine en 1842. Reçut un doctorat en droit del'université Laval en 1854. Cofondateur du Law Reporter de Montréal.Membre de la Commission de codification des lois civiles du Bas-Canada àcompter de 1859.

Décédé à Sainte-Adèle de Terrebonne, le 27 juillet 1865, à l'âge de 61ans et 9 mois. Inhumé dans l'église Notre-Dame-du-Rosaire, àSaint-Hyacinthe, le 30 juillet 1865.

Avait épousé dans la chapelle Saint-Louis de la cathédrale Notre-Dame deQuébec, le 28 février 1843, Adèle Raymond, fille du marchand JosephRaymond et de Louise Cartier.

L'Honorable AUGUSTIN NORBERT MORIN
(1803-1865)
par
M. L’Abbé Elie-J. AUCLAIR

Nous avons eu deux Morin dans la vie publique au Canada : AugustinNorbert, qui fut premier ministre sous l'Union, et Louis Siméon, devingt ans plus jeune, qui fut aussi ministre avant la Confédération. Ilsétaient de familles différentes et sans proche parenté entre eux. Ils'agit ici du premier des deux.

Augustin Norbert Morin naquit, le 13 octobre 1803, à Saint Michel deBellechasse, d'une brave famille de cultivateurs, qui compta onzeenfants dont il était l'aîné. Son ancêtre à la septième génération,Pierre Morin, est signalé à Port Royal, en Acadie, dans le recensementde 1671. Son père, Augustin Morin, marié en 1802 à Marie Colin Dugal,continuait à Saint Michel la tradition terrienne de ses anciens et iljouissait d'une certaine aisance. Distingué, à cause de ses talentsbrillants, par son curé l'abbé McGuire, Augustin-Norbert, comme aussiFrançois l'un de ses frères cadets, qui devint prêtre, fut envoyé auséminaire de Québec pour y faire ses études. Condisciple d'EtienneParent, il lui disputa les premiers prix de leur classe. C'est à Québecégalement que le jeune Morin commença en 1824 son cours de droit. Ilvint le terminer à Montréal, au bureau de Denis Benjamin Viger, où ilpassa deux ans, et, en 1828, il était admis au barreau.

Comme Lafontaine, Morin débuta jeune sur la scène publique. Sa lettre aujuge Bowen, de novembre 1825, qu'il signait Un étudiant en droit, etdans laquelle il revendiquait vigoureusement les droits de la languefrançaise, est restée fameuse. Elle le fit connaître et attira sur luil'attention, car l'anonymat en fut vite percé. En 1826, alors qu'ilétait encore étudiant, Duvernay et Viger, en fondant La Minerve, lechoisirent pour en être l'un des principaux rédacteurs. Le 26 octobre1830, à 27 ans, la même année que Lafontaine, il était élu député à laChambre de Québec. Tandis que Lafontaine représentait Terrebonne, Morin,lui, était l'élu de Bellechasse.

C'est Morin qui rédigea, en 1831, à la demande de Papineau et de sesamis et adhérents, le célèbre document dit des 92 résolutions. Cedocument, qui condensait les griefs des Canadiens, ayant été approuvépar tous les députés nationaux du temps, Morin fut chargé en 1834d'aller les présenter aux autorités de Londres, où, avec Viger, déléguédu Bas Canada, il soutint les droits de ses compatriotes, sans grandsuccès pour le moment. Revenu au pays, il fut activement mêlé, commelieutenant de Papineau à Québec, au mouvement qui devait aboutir, contreson gré, car il ne fut jamais partisan de la violence, aux "troubles" de1837. Désigné comme suspect en 1838, il dut se cacher dans les bois pouréviter la prison. Il reparut à Québec au départ de Colborne en octobre1839. Comme Lafontaine, il demanda en vain qu'on lui fît son procès.

Sous l'Union, Morin fut député de Nicolet d'avril 1841 à janvier 1842.Nommé juge à Kamouraska, ce 1er janvier 1842, il démissionna pour entrerdans le premier ministère Lafontaine Baldwin en 1843. Il se fit d'abordélire député de Saguenay. Aux élections de novembre 1844, ce sont sesanciens électeurs de Bellechasse qui le choisirent comme député.Lafontaine et Baldwin ayant repris le pouvoir en 1848, après quelquesannées dans l'opposition, Morin fut élu président de la Chambre. C'étaitsous lord Elgin (1847 1854). Morin présidait la séance du Parlement àMontréal, en 1849, quand, pour protester contre le "bill" desindemnités, les torys mirent le feu aux édifices parlementaires. Stoïqueà la façon d'un sénateur romain, il attendit pour lever la séance qu'onproposât une motion d'ajournement. Il aurait brûlé sur place, a écrit L.O. David, plutôt que de manquer à l'ordre.

Lafontaine ayant démissionné en 1851, pour être nommé juge deux ans plustard, Morin le remplaça à la tête du parti pour le Bas Canada, et, auxélections de décembre, il fut élu, à son tour, député de Terrebonne.C'est alors qu'il forma avec M. Hincks, du Haut Canada, le ministère quiporte leur nom devant l'histoire. En juin 1854, ce ministère HincksMorin était renversé, et, aux élections qui suivirent, Morin fut défaitdans Terrebonne. Elu peu après dans Chicoutimi, il forma avec M. McNab,chef des conservateurs du Haut Canada, un gouvernement de coalition.C'est ce ministère McNab Morin qui marque dans l'histoire la naissancedu parti libéral conservateur. A la fin de la session de 1855, Morin futnommé juge de la cour supérieure. Quatre ans plus tard. en 1859, ilétait chargé, avec les juges Day et Caron, de la codification des loisdu Bas Canada, mesure rendue nécessaire surtout par l'abrogation desdroits seigneuriaux et l'abolition de l'ancien système féodal. Sesdernières années, il les occupa dans ce labeur ardu et délicat de lacodification de nos lois. Entre temps, et depuis 1842 environ, ils'intéressait à l’œuvre de la colonisation, et c'est lui qui fondaSainte-Adèle, au nord de Montréal. Il venait à peine de terminer sontravail de codification et de le voir sanctionné par une mesure dugouvernement quand il mourut subitement, à Sainte Adèle le 27 juillet1865, à 62 ans. Ses restes mortels furent inhumés à Saint Hyacinthe.

En 1843, Morin, alors juge, avait épousé, à Saint Hyacinthe, AdèleRaymond, la sœur de Mgr Raymond, supérieur du séminaire de cette ville.Il n'eut pas d'enfants de ce mariage, et, par conséquent, commeLafontaine, il n'a pas laissé de postérité. "M. Morin, écrivait L. O.David en 1870, avait la taille haute et courbée. Tout dans sonextérieur, ses manières et sa physionomie, respirait la modestie, labonté et la douceur. Dans ses campagnes politiques, il avait plutôtl'air d'un évêque en visite pastorale que d'un candidat en quête d'uncomté. Il parlait avec la simplicité du bon curé de village qui fait leprône à ses paroissiens depuis vingt cinq ans. La vie a été pour luicomme une mission, un sacrifice continuel et un enchaînement de bonnesactions. Servir Dieu, son pays et ses concitoyens, fut l'unique objet deses aspirations, de ses efforts et de ses travaux . . ."

Appréciant son oeuvre de colonisateur dans le nord de Montréal, M.l'abbé Edmond Langevin-Lacroix, dans son Histoire de Sainte Adèle(1927), écrit de même : "Sans doute, M. Morin ne demeura pashabituellement dans nos montagnes. Mais il y revenait aussi souvent queses fonctions d'homme public le lui permettaient . . . Le passage dugrand homme, colon enthousiaste, était un encouragement pour tous. Defait, très au courant de la vie pénible de nos braves gens, il aidaittout le monde. Bien qu'il fût pauvre lui même, sa charité l'empêchant dedevenir riche, chacun avait des redevances à lui solder. En venant versle nord, il disait parfois qu'il allait percevoir ses dus. Mais, le plussouvent, désarmé devant la misère, il vidait ses poches et empruntaitpour s'en retourner . . ."

On cite de nombreux traits qui le peignent sur le vif, homme de boncœur, toujours généreux et charitable. En voici quelques-uns. Un jourqu'il était très occupé, un mendiant se présente qui venait très souventà son bureau. "Dites donc, mon ami, échappa M. Morin, vous n'êtes pasraisonnable. . ." Mais, l'autre n'était pas sorti du bureau que le graveministre courait après lui pour s'excuser. Une autre fois, un colon, quilui devait une somme assez rondelette et avait reçu une lettre sévère deson agent d'avoir à régler, se présente à M. Morin, s'excuse de sesretards, parle de ses misères, de sa pauvreté, de sa nombreuse famille.. . "Oui, oui, mon ami, je comprends, dit aussitôt M. Morin, vous avezbeaucoup à souffrir. Tenez, prenez ces cinq piastres, ça vous aidera."Chauveau à qui M. Morin avait promis de placer quelqu'un, le rencontresur la rue. Aussitôt, Morin s'excuse de n'avoir pas encore rempli sapromesse. "Je vais m'en occuper, dit il, comme de moi même." "Gardezvous en bien, reprend Chauveau, traitez le plutôt comme s'il était votreennemi juré, je suis sûr qu'il sera bien placé." Jolie boutade quimontre fort justement ce qu'était Morin. Quand Morin fut nommé juge àKamouraska, le 1er janvier 1842, il se rendit tout de suite, le dimanchesuivant, faire visite aux siens à Saint Michel de Bellechasse. Il arrivadevant l'église de la paroisse, à l'heure de la grand'messe, au momentoù les gens allaient y entrer. Il avait alors 39 ans et il était déjà unpersonnage, ancien ministre et nouveau juge. Mais, il avait le culte desbonnes vieilles traditions. Apercevant son père, au milieu de la foule,il va vers lui, se découvre, se met à genoux dans la neige et luidemande tout simplement sa bénédiction du jour de l'an. Ce détail esttypique.

Quand Morin mourut en juillet 1865, Chauveau qui l'avait beaucouppratiqué et bien connu, écrivit cette note de louange, que je me plais àrappeler pour finir ma modeste notice : "Il y a eu peu d'hommes en cepays plus curieux de s'instruire et plus instruits sur toutes sortes desujets que M. Morin, et, certainement, il n'y a jamais eu d'hommespublics aussi remplis de désintéressement et d'abnégation, debienveillance et d'urbanité, de modestie et d'humilité. Il poussait mêmela modestie et l'humilité jusqu'à l'excès, et ces qualitésl'emportaient, chez lui, quand il s'agissait de se juger lui même, surson jugement par ailleurs si juste et si fin. Il s'est occupé activementet avec succès toujours d'une immense variété de sujets. Droit romain etdroit moderne, théologie et droit ecclésiastique, sciences, agriculture,instruction publique, littérature, langues anciennes et languesmodernes, finances et statistiques, rien ne semblait être au dessus, niau dessous, de ses recherches, de son ambition de savoir et d'agir, et,en somme, de faire le bien, ce qui a été l'unique but de toutes sespensées."

Source : Abbé Elie-J. AUCLAIR, Figures canadiennes. Deuxième série,Montréal, éditions Albert Lévesque, 1933, 209p., pp. 20-28 
MORIN, Augustin-Norbert (I1321)
 
924 Eudoxia Lascarina LASCARIS, Eudoxie (I4343)
 
925 Event 1: ATWATER, Heman (I1707)
 
926 Event 1: BOSS, Henry (I1639)
 
927 Event 1: POCKETT, Isabella (I1628)
 
928 Event 1: DENEAU, René (I1260)
 
929 executed Bernhard Cte d'Aulun (I4772)
 
930 Fait une chute sur un terrain glacé. Cause sa mort. HÉBERT, Louis (I2170)
 
931 Faite prisonnière par Alaric en 410, puis épouse de son successeur. Ellefonde la basilique Saint-Jean l'Evangéliste à Rome. Profession :Impératrice de Rome de 421 à 450. DE ROME, Galla Placidia (I5494)
 
932 Family bible in pocession of Karen Randall RR1 Afton Stn. N.S. B0H 1A0.Albert was a farmer; was Captain of Militia. They were Anglican andresided in Bayfield, Nova Scotia. RANDALL, Albert (I3909)
 
933 Family moved sometime around the turn of the century from Bayfield, N.S.down to Hartford, Conn.; perhaps after George died? Charlotte lived onSigourney St. RANDALL, Charlotte Theresa (I3885)
 
934 Farmer; Anglican. They resided in Afton, Nova Scotia. RANDALL, Joseph Dexter (I3904)
 
935 fièvre pourpre MIVILLE, Jacques d. Deschênes (I3297)
 
936 fièvre pourpre. Enterrée sous la chapelle de Rivière-Ouelle DE BAILLON, Catherine Marie (I3296)
 
937 fille de Louis Hébert et de Marie Rollet, mariée à Guillaume Couillard le26 août 1621, née à Paris ou à Dieppe vers 1606, morte à Québec en1684.

À la mort de Louis Hébert, en 1627, sa fille Guillemette et sonmari, Guillaume Couillard, héritèrent de la moitié de ses biens.Couillard devint le chef de la famille, car le frère de sa femme,Guillaume, était encore mineur. Jusqu’en 1632, la maison des Hébert,sise sur le bord de la falaise, était la seule habitation privée àQuébec. Il y avait un peu plus loin le petit fort en bois construit parChamplain et, juste au-dessous de celui-ci, au bord du fleuve,l’Habitation flanquée de la petite chapelle des Récollets. Les deuxseuls autres bâtiments qui comptaient étaient le couvent des Récolletset celui des Jésuites, situés à un mille de là sur la rivièreSaint-Charles et au delà d’un bois épais. Guillemette et sa mèrerestaient souvent seules chez elles, car Couillard passait bien du tempssur le fleuve, et le serviteur, Henri, venu de France avec les Hébert,avait été massacré par les sauvages l’année même de la mort de LouisHébert.

Comme ses parents, Mme Couillard s’intéressait aux petits Indienset fut marraine d’un grand nombre d’entre eux. Après la capture deQuébec par les Anglais en 1629, elle accueillit chez elle Charité etEspérance, deux des trois petites Indiennes protégées par Champlain, quecelui-ci aurait voulu remmener en France. David Kirke ayant refuséd’autoriser ce voyage, les petites filles demandèrent d’être envoyéeschez Mme Couillard. Ce devait être un foyer cosmopolite, car ilcomprenait en outre Olivier Le Jeune, petit nègre malgache que lesAnglais avaient vendu à Olivier Le Baillif et dont celui-ci avait faitdon à la famille Couillard. Guillemette et sa mère veillèrent à soninstruction religieuse, et il fut baptisé en 1633. En 1648, lesCouillard avaient d’autres serviteurs et dix enfants ; c’était un ménagebruyant, voire indiscipliné, si l’on en croit le Journal des Jésuites.Au mariage de la troisième fille, Élisabeth, en novembre 1645, deuxviolons – chose inouïe au Canada – accompagnaient les chantres de lachapelle. Le début des années 1660 fut toutefois pour Mme Couillard unepériode très pénible. Deux de ses fils, d’abord Nicolas, âgé de 20 ans,puis Guillaume, âgé de 27 ans, et son neveu Joseph Hébert tombèrentvictimes des Iroquois (1661–1662) et son mari décéda au mois de mars1663.

Riches propriétaires terriens (les Hébert possédaient des terresen plus de leur concession primitive), Mme Couillard et son mari avaientfait divers dons à des fins charitables et religieuses : à l’église en1652 et à l’Hôtel-Dieu en 1655 et en 1659. Devenue veuve, elle vendit àMgr de Laval*, en 1666, le terrain nécessaire à la construction du petitséminaire. Les jeunes de sa famille s’opposèrent énergiquement à lavente de cette propriété de grande valeur (le fief du Sault-au-Matelot)où son mari et elle s’étaient d’abord établis. Le litige amorcé par leshéritiers présomptifs devait se poursuivre pendant des générations,voire jusqu’au xxe siècle.

Chagrinée sans doute par cette querelle de famille et devenueinvalide, elle se retira au couvent de l’Hôtel-Dieu et y vécut commepensionnaire jusqu’à sa mort. Lorsque, en 1678, on exhuma les restes deson père pour les déposer ailleurs, elle se fit transporter à lachapelle des Récollets afin d’assister à la cérémonie. Elle s’éteigniten 1684, à l’âge d’environ 78 ans, et fut inhumée à côté de son maridans la chapelle de l’Hôtel-Dieu. Elle laissait alors plus de 250descendants. On pourrait difficilement en estimer le nombreaujourd’hui. 
HÉBERT, Marie Guillemette (I2169)
 
938 Fille Illégitime ou fille d'Edith d'ANGLETERRE (?). DE GERMANIE, Richilde (I6099)
 
939 Fille illégitime. DE SUEDE, Astrid (I6144)
 
940 Fils cadet. Profession : Duc de Gascogne. DE GASCOGNE, Lupus II (I5853)
 
941 Fin Mariage : 946 Family F2771
 
942 Fin Mariage: 18 Octobre 942 Family F3384
 
943 Fin Mariage: avant 856 Family F2658
 
944 following a battle with cancer ANDERSON, Francis Lloyd (I880)
 
945 fondateur de l'abbaye de St-Denis

Dagobert, King of the Franks:
Grant of an Estate to Monks of St. Denis, 635
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A grant of an estate in the seventh century was perhaps the gift ofgreatest value that could be given by one person to another. No land wasgranted as a rule without the accompanying forms of wealth described byDagobert in this charter. Note that serfs and bondsmen were not excludedin making the gift. Twenty-seven estates were given at one time byDagobert to the Abbey of St. Denis.

Dagobert, King of the Franks, illustrious monarch, to Wandelbert, theDuke. Whatever we have devoutly granted for the relief of the poor, webelieve we shall have returned to us with profit in the next life.Therefore be it known that we have exchanged our villa called Saclas,situated on the River Juine, in the district of Etampes, and which wehave received from Lord Ferreol, Bishop of the diocese of Autun, andfrom Abbot Deodatus, the clergy and church or basilica of Symphorian, inwhose care it is known to have been, for another villa called Amica,which is in the district of Marseilles, to the increase of our fortune.And that same Saclas we have devoutly granted in its entirety to themonks of St. Denis, the martyr, at the monastery where his precious bodynow rests, being within their gates. Therefore we have ordered that fromthe present date they shall possess the villa of Saclas, with itshouses, serfs, bondsmen, woods, meadows, pastures, mills, flocks,shepherds, wholly and entirely, just as it was formerly held by thechurch of Autun and Symphorian until we, as has been said, exchanged itfor another. Therefore, because it has been granted of our bounty, forthe salvation of our soul, to the monks of St. Denis, according to God'swill, neither the abbot nor any other person shall at any time presumeto destroy this gift to the monks; but let it be administered in thename of God by the hand of their abbot in whose assiduous care the monkslive. And in whatever way the fisc can augment its aid to the poor monkslet it do so, so that they and their successors may delight in thestability of our kingdom and pray for the salvation of our soul. Andthat this charter may endure for all time we have decreed that it besigned with our signature. Ursin obtained it. Dagobert granted it.
Given on July 28th in the fourteenth year of our reign, at Clichy.
Amen.



DAGOBERT I (d. 639), king of the Franks, was the son of Clotaire II. In623 his father established him as king of the region east of theArdennes, and in 626 revived for him the ancient kingdom of Austrasia,minus Aquitaine and Provence. As Dagobert was but yet a child, he wasplaced under the authority of the mayor of the palace, Pepin, andArnulf, bishop of Metz. At the death of Clotaire II in 628, Dagobertwished to re-establish unity in the Frankish realm, and in 629 and 630make expeditions into Neustria and Burgundy, where he succeeded on thewhole in securing the recognition of his authority. In Aquitaine he gavehis brother Caribert the administration of the counties of Toulouse,Cahors, Agen, Perogeux and Saintes; but at Caribert's death in 632Dagobert became sole ruler of the whole of the Frankish territoriessouth of the Loire. Under him the Merovingian monarchy attained itsculminating point. He restored to the royal domain the lands that hadbeen usurped by the great nobles and by the church; he maintained atParis a luxurious, though, from the example he himself set, a disorderlycourt; he was a patron of the arts and delighted in the exquisitecraftsmanship of his treasurer, the goldsmith, St. Eloi. His authoritywas recognized through the length and breadth of the realm. The duke ofthe Basques came to his court to swear fidelity, and at his villa atClichy the chief of the Bretons of Domnone promised obedience. Heintervened in the affairs of the Visigoths of Spain and the Lombards ofItaly, and was heard with deference. Indeed, as a sovereign, Dagobertwas reckoned superior to the other barbarian kings. He entered intorelations with the eastern empire, and swore a 'perpetual peace' withthe emperor Heraclius; and it is probable that the two sovereigns tookcommon measures against the Slav and Burgundian tribes which ravaged inturn the Byzantine state and the German territories subject to theFranks. Dagobert protected the church and placed illustrious prelates atthe head of the bishoprics---Eloi (Eligius) at Noyon, Ouen (Audoenus) atRouen and Didier (Desiderius) at Cahors. His reign is also marked by thecreation of numerous monasteries and by renewed missionary activity inFlanders and among the Basques. He died on Jan 9, 639, as was buried atSt. Denis. After his death the Frankish monarchy was again divided. In634 he had been obliged to give the Austrasians a special king in theperson of his eldest son Sigebert, and at the birth of a second son,Colvis, in 635, the Neustrians had immediately claimed him as king. Thusthe unification of the realm, which Dagobert had re-established with somuch pains, was anulled.

In 622 he became king of Austrasia and in 629 of all the Frankishlands.He secured peace by making a friendship treaty with theByzantineEmperor, Heraclius, by defeating the Gascons and theBretons, thencampaigning against the Slavs on his eastern frontier.In 631 he sent anarmy to Spain to help the Visigothic usurper, Swinthila. He moved hiscapital from Austrasia to Paris, a centrallocation from which thekingdom could be governed more effectively. He then appeased theAustrasians by making his three-year-old son,Sigebert, their king in634. Dagobert loved justice but was alsogreedy and dissolute. During hisreign there was a revival of the arts, a revision of the Frankish law,and encouragement for learning. Dagobert founded the first great abbeyof Saint Denis to which he mademany gifts. His chief advisers were twoAustrasian aristocrats, Arnulf, bishopof Metz, and Pippin, who was mademayor of Dagobert's palace. It was amarriage arranged between Arnulf'sson and Pippin's daughter that was to form the powerful dynasty knownlater as the Carolingians 
DE FRANCE, roi Dagobert I (I4909)
 
946 Fondatrice de l'Abbaye de Pruem. Bertrada 'The Elder' (I4875)
 
947 Fondatrice du Monastère de Saint-Quirin. D'OEHNINGEN, Judith (I6118)
 
948 For some reason, she hated her name (especially Norberta) and didn'tallow it to be used. Went by nickname "Bertie". CORBETT, Jessica Norberta (I5)
 
949 Forander says her name was Kaneakauhi or Kaneakaula.

From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Look at Keakahiwaakama (w) who married Kuhinahinau (k), konohiki chief of Kawaihae, Hawaii.
Born was Kekaikuihala (w) who married Kalanikaumakaowakea (k), King of Maui.
Born was Kamaikahuakai (k), the chief of east Maui.
Born was Nakaiokeakakaiuli (k), the chief of east Maui.
These two chiefs, the chiefly ancestors seen above, they were responsible for hiding Keliimaikai, namely Kalanimalokuloku, the younger brother of Kamehameha (the governor) of Kamehameha who ruled east Maui and fled in battle and barely escaped.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kaneakuahi is the name used by S.M. Kamakau. 
KEKAIKUIHALA (KEKAIKUIHALA I, KE-KAI-KU'I-HALA, KANEKAUHI, KANEAKAULA) (I40745)
 
950 Forander says she is "Kapukini". The genealogist S.L.K. Pelioholani says she is "Kapulani Nui". There was an earlier Kapulani (daughter of Ulu), who we will refer to henceforth as Kapulani-a-Ulu to disntiguis her from this Kapulani Nui or "Kapulani the First".

S.L.K. Peleioholani teaches that she is the daughter of Liloa and Pinea (Ancestry of the Robinson Family). In other genealogies she is said to be the daughter of Liloa and Haua. 
KAPULANI-NUI (KAPUKINI I, KAPULANI-O-LILOA) (I40531)
 
951 Forander says the father was King Keawe (Keaweikekahialiiokamoku) and the mother was the wife "Kanaalae". But his mother was known by two names, both for the same woman: Kane-a-La'e (Kane'alai, Kane-alae) or (Ha'okalani) Ha-o-kalani. She was a Ruling Chiefess of Molokai, one of the last independent rulers of Molokai.

Solomon Peleioholani says:
Keaweikekahialiiokamoku (k)/ King of Hawaii/ married Hoakalani (w); born were five children. Kumukoa (k) was one of the children. Kumukoa (k) married Kahawalu (w), mother of Kauhiaimokuakama (k); born was Kaikilani III (w).

- D. Kekoolani (Jan 23, 2010) 
AWILI ('AWILI, AWILINUI), (Molokai Chief) (Molokai Chief) (I41097)
 
952 Forander says the father was King Keawe (Keaweikekahialiiokamoku) and the mother was the wife "Kanaalae". But his mother was known by two names, both for the same woman: Kane-a-La'e (Kane'alai, Kane-alae) or (Ha'okalani) Ha-o-kalani. She was a Ruling Chiefess of Molokai, one of the last independent rulers of Molokai.

Solomon Peleioholani says:
Keaweikekahialiiokamoku (k)/ King of Hawaii/ married Hoakalani (w); born were five children. Kumukoa (k) was one of the children. Kumukoa (k) married Kahawalu (w), mother of Kauhiaimokuakama (k); born was Kaikilani III (w).

- D. Kekoolani (Jan 23, 2010) 
KALILOAMOKU (KA-LI-LOA-MOKU), (Molokai Chief) (Molokai Chief) (I41099)
 
953 Forander, Malo, Kamakau called thid chiefess Kahihiokalani. She was the mother of Heleipawa.

Aunt-nephew marriage is Ho'i. 
KAHIHIOKALANI (KAHIHIOKALANI I, KA-HIHI-O-KA-LANI) (I40496)
 
954 Formerly Mrs. Ami Pinehasa Wood WOOD, Ami Pinehaka (Ruth Ami, Ami Ahua) (I42901)
 
955 Fornander and Kamakau call her Kahakuhaakoi. KAHAKUHA'AKOI WAHINI-PIO (KAHAKUHAAKOI) (I42250)
 
956 FORNANDER:
"Certain it is that during the summer of this year (1790), Kamehameha, assuming the style of " Moi" of Hawaii, sent to Keawemauhili of Hilo and Keoua-Kuahuula of Kau to furnish him with canoes and troops for a contemplated invasion of Maui. Keawemauhili complied with the summons of Karnehameha, and sent a large force of men and canoes under command of his own sons Keaweokahikwna, Eleele or Elelule, Koakanu, and his nephew Kalaipaihala." 
KOAKANU (KOAKANU I) (I42351)
 
957 FORNANDER: "This sea-fight off Waipio is remembered by the natives under the name of "Ke-pu-waha-ula-ula" and also of"Kawai." it occurred in 1791, before the death of Keoua Kuahuula. Some time after this, Peapea Jfokawnk~t,h e nephew of Kahekili and Kaeo, was fatally wounded by the explosion of a keg of gunpowder on the hill of Kauwiki. He was removed to Honokohau in the Kaanapali district, where he shortly afterwards died from his wounds." PE'APE'A MAKAWALU (II) (I40860)
 
958 fought in World War I CORBETT, Claud Reginald (I1032)
 
959 Fought overseas in WWI MACDONALD, Roderick (I1215)
 
960 founded Lorsch Abbey with her son and grandson VON WORMSGAU, Williswint (I338)
 
961 founded the convent

Abbesse de Nivelles dans le Brabant Belge 
DE METZ, Saint Itta (I5649)
 
962 founded the Heinsberg monastery VON WALBECK, Oda (I4603)
 
963 Founded the Nunnery Of St. Giles in the Wood and Westacre AbbeyinNorfolk. DE TOENI, Roger (I6275)
 
964 founder and organizer or the parish of Lourdes, NS MACDONALD, Father William B. (I1221)
 
965 Founder of Scotlands Dynasty. Whether Celtic or Norse in origin, thepagan kings of Scotland were considered to be sacred beings. At hisinauguration each king had to go through various religious rituals, as aresult of which he and his people felt that the Lucky Spirit of thecommunity entered and dwelt in the king's body, hence the belief thatthe royal families descended from the gods. Since this Lucky Spirit'shuman manifestation could not be allowed to decay, such kings wereperiodically sacrificed or slain by their rightful successors. Alpin,son of Eochaid IV 'the Poisonous', king of Dalriada, became king ofKintyre in March 834, only to be killed in battle with the Picts inGalloway in August the same year. King Alpin King of Kintyre (I5298)
 
966 Founder of the Deisi Tribe Type: Distinction MAC FEREDACH, Fiacha Fionn Ola , 104th King of Ireland at Tara (I610)
 
967 Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls) Source (S489)
 
968 Fourth Earl of Hereford 1143-1155. He founded the Abbey of FlaxleyinGoucester. After the accession of Henry II in December 1154, heopposedthe King concerning the Castle of Gloucester. It was justafter thatthat he was excommunicated by the Bishop of Hereford andthat hesurrended his castles, fees, and the earldom. These wereapparentlyregranted, but shortly thereafter he became a monk(Complete Peerage,VI:454-455). FITZMILES, Roger (I6579)
 
969 France Ouest Rural (872) RATTÉ, Jacques (I3694)
 
970 François BOURC 28, wife, Marguerite BOUDROT; Children: Michel 5, and 1daughter; cattle 15, sheep. Family F2617
 
971 François GAUTEROT, 58, wife, Edmée LeJEUNE; Children: Marie 35, Charles34, Marie 24, René 19, Marguerite 16, Jean 23, François 19, Claude 12,Charles 10, Jeanne 7, Germain 3; cattle 16, sheep 6 GAUTROT, François (I4976)
 
972 Francois GIROUARD, 50, wife Jeanne AUCOIN; Children: Jacob 23, Germain14, and 3 daughters; cattle 16, sheep 12 Family F2802
 
973 Francois GOTRO 71, Emee LEJEUNE 61; 3 guns, 4 arpents, 8 cattle, 5 sheep,8 hogs GAUTROT, François (I4976)
 
974 Fredegund d. 597, Paris French FREDEGONDE, queen consort of ChilpericI, the Merovingian Frankish king of Soissons. Originally a servant,Fredegund became Chilperic's mistress after he had murdered his wife andqueen, Galswintha (c. 568). Galswintha, however, was also the sister ofBrunhild, the wife of Chilperic's half-brother Sigebert I, king of theeastern kingdom of Austrasia. Galswintha's murder engendered a violentanimosity between Fredegund and Brunhild and an irreconcilable feud ofmore than 40 years' duration between the respective families. Fredegundwas certainly responsible for the assassination of Sigebert in 575 andmade attempts on the lives of Guntram (her brother-in-law and the kingof Burgundy), Childebert II (Sigebert's son), and Brunhild. After themysterious assassination of Chilperic (584), Fredegund seized his richesand took refuge in the cathedral at Paris. Both she and her survivingson, Chlotar II, were at first protected by Guntram, but, when he diedin 592, Childebert II, who had taken over his throne, attacked Chlotar,albeit unsuccessfully. From Childebert's death (595) until her own,Fredegund intrigued on Chlotar's behalf against Brunhild, who sought torule through Childebert's sons, Theodebert II of Austrasia and TheodoricII of Burgundy. Ruthlessly murderous and sadistically cruel, Fredegundcan have few rivals in monstrousness.

One of the most bloodthirsty women in history, she had been the maid ofChilperic I's second wife, Galsvintha, whom he had murdered; Fredegundethen became his queen consort. However, Chilperic I's half-brother,Sigebert I, King of the eastern kingdom of Austrasia, was married toBrunhild, the latter being a sister of Galsvintha. The murder ofGalsvintha caused a violent feud between Fredegund and Brunhild, andalso between the two branches of the family, which lasted some fortyyears. Fredegund was certainly responsible for the murder of Sigebert in575 and made attempts on the lives of Guntram, her brother-in-law andking of Burgundy, and on Childebert II, Sigebert I's son, and Brunhild.In 584 her husband was mysteriously murdered. Fredegund thenseized his riches and took refuge in the cathedral in Paris.Guntram, her brother-in-law, protected both her and her surviving son,Chlotar II, until he died in 592. Childebert II, who had succeededGuntram, unsuccesfully attacked Chlotar II. However, Childebert II diedin 595, and, in the last two years of her life, Fredegund intrigued onChlotar II's behalf against Brunhild who sought to rule throughChildebert II's sons, Theodebert II of Austrasia and Theodoric II ofBurgundy. Ruthless, murderous and sadistically cruel, Fredegund must beregarded as one of the most monstrous in history. 
Fredegunde (I5341)
 
975 Frère de Garnier II, Maire du Palais de Neustrie. DE TREVES (I5627)
 
976 Frère de l'Empereur Byzantin Maurice (Flavius Mauricius Tiberius) né vers539, empereur en 582 et assassiné en 602. DE BYZANCE, Petrus Augustus (I5599)
 
977 FROM
An account of the Polynesian race: Its origins and migrations and the ancient history of the Hawaiian people to the times of Kamehameha I, by Abraham Fornanader:

Page 209

"Lonohonuakini ascended the throne of Maui under the flattering auspices of peace and prosperity bequeathed by his father, and, with singular good fortune, succeeded in maintaining the same peaceful and orderly condition during his own reign also. Though the yearly feasts and the monthly sacrifices were performed as usual, though bards gathered to the chieftain's court to chant the deeds of his ancestors and extol the wealth and glory of his own reign, yet the smooth and placid stream of this and the preceding reigns left no ripple on the traditional record, and considering the convulsed condition of the neighbouring islands, this absolute silence is their noblest epitaph.

Lonohonuakini's wife was Kalanikauanakinilani with whom he had the following children:—Kaulahea, a son, who succeeded his father in the government; Lonomakaihonua, who was grandfather to the celebrated bard Keaulumoku ; Kalaniomaiheuila, mother of Kalanikahimakeialii, the wife of Kualii of Oahu, and, through her daughter Kaionuilalahai, grandmother of Kahahana, the last independent king of Oahu, of the Oahu race of chiefs, who lost his life and his kingdom in the war with Maui in 1783." 
KAHAHANA, (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of O'ahu) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of O'ahu) (I40678)
 
978 From a longer article in which S.M. Kamakau and O.J. Koii dispute each other's genealogies. Source (S435)
 
979 FROM Britannia Internet Magazine, www.britannia.com, Internet. ArviragusA personage who has come to our attention, first, in the writings ofJuvenal, who mentions him in connection with resistance to Romanconquest and authority. Geoffrey of Monmouth refers to him as a Britishking whose brother was killed sometime during Claudius' invasion (43AD). He has been linked with Caratacus, but more interestingly, he issaid by the interpolators of William of Malmesbury's 'De AntiquitateGlastoniensis Ecclesiae' to be the king who granted 12 hides of landaround Glastonbury to Joseph of Arimathea and his band of followers,when they brought Christianity to Britain for the first time in 63 AD.Some scholars think that it may have been Arviragus and his people whooccupied the ancient hillfort, located in the county of Somerset, knownas Cadbury Castle (which would later come to be associated with KingArthur), and used it as a base for their resistance against the Romans. AP CYNFELYN, Arviragus Gweirydd , High King of Prydein or Britain (I564)
 
980 From Email Correspondence Brazil-Kekoolani 2007 Source (S393)
 
981 From Encyclopedia Britannica Online, article titled 'Alfonso I:' 'alsocalled Afonso Henriques, byname AFONSO THE CONQUEROR, PortugueseAFONSO OCONQUISTADOR, the first king of Portugal (1139-85), whoconqueredSantarâem and Lisbon from the Muslims (1147) and securedPortugueseindependence from Leon (1139). 'Alfonso VI, emperor of Leon,had granted the county of Portugal toAfonso's father, Henry of Burgundy,who successfully defended itagainst the Muslims (1095-1112). Henrymarried Alfonso VI'sillegitimate daughter, Teresa, who governed Portugalfrom the time ofher husband's death (1112) until her son Afonso came ofage. Sherefused to cede her power to Afonso, but his party prevailed intheBattle of Säao Mamede, near Guimaräaes (1128). Though at firstobligedas a vassal to submit to his cousin Alfonso VII of Leon,Afonsoassumed the title of king in 1139. 'By victory in the Battle ofOurique (1139) he was able to imposetribute on his Muslim neighbours;and in 1147 he further capturedSantarâem and, availing himself of theservices of passing crusaders,successfully laid siege to Lisbon. Hecarried his frontiers beyond theTagus River, annexing Beja in 1162 andâEvora in 1165; in attackingBadajoz, he was taken prisoner but thenreleased. He married Mafaldaof Savoy and associated his son, Sancho I,with his power. By the timeof his death he had created a stable andindependent monarchy.' PORTUGAL, ALFONSO I HENRIQUES of (I6529)
 
982 From Encyclopedia Britannica Online, article titled 'Alfonso VI:' 'bynameALFONSO THE EMPEROR, Spanish ALFONSO EL EMPERADOR, king ofLeon andCastile from 1126 to 1157, son of Raymond of Burgundy and thegrandson ofAlfonso VI, whose imperial title he assumed. Though hisreign saw theapogee of the imperial idea in medieval Spain and thoughhe won notablevictories against the Moors, he remains a somewhat hazyfigure. 'Hischildhood was complicated by the struggle between his motherUrraca andher second husband, Alfonso I of Aragon, for control ofCastile and Leon.Only on Urraca's death (1126) did his stepfatherfinally relinquish hisclaims. Alfonso was then formally accepted asemperor by the kings ofAragon and Pamplona (Navarre), by the count ofBarcelona, and by variousHispano-Moorish rulers. His capture ofAlmerâia (1147) from the Moors wonhim renown, as did other victories,but in the end these led to littleexpansion of territory. Almerâia was lost again in 1157 andCâordobaremained in his hands for only three years. In 1146 a newinvasion ofNorth African fanatics, the Almohads, began. Alfonso nowalliedhimself with the Almoravids and devoted the rest of his life toaseries of campaigns to check Almohad expansion in southern Spain.'Despite the importance of the imperial idea at this time,peninsularfractionalist tendencies were by no means dormant. Alfonso wasunableto prevent the establishment of Portugal as an independentkingdom(1140) and, in his will, he himself divided his realm, as wastheSpanish custom, between his two sons, Sancho III of CastileandFerdinand II of Leon. This act finally destroyed the concept ofempire in medieval Spain.' RAIMUNDEZ, King Alfonso VII of Leon (I6515)
 
983 From Encyclopedia Britannica Online, article titled 'Alfonso VIII:''byname EL DE LAS NAVAS (SPANISH: HE OF LAS NAVAS), king of Castilefrom1158, son of Sancho III, whom he succeeded when three years old. 'BeforeAlfonso came of age his reign was troubled by internal strifeand theintervention of the kingdom of Navarre in Castilian affairs.Throughouthis reign he maintained a close alliance with the kingdomof Aragon, andin 1179 he concluded the Pact of Cazorla, which settledthe future lineof demarcation between Castile and Aragon when thereconquest of MoorishSpain was completed. From 1172 to 1212 he wasengaged in resistance tothe Moorish Almohad invaders, who defeatedhim in 1195. In the same yearthe kings of Leon and Navarre invadedCastile, but Alfonso defeated themwith the aid of King Peter II ofAragon. In 1212 Alfonso secured a greatvictory at Las Navas de Tolosaover the Almohad sultan and thereby brokeAlmohad power in Spain.' SANCHEZ, Alfonso VIII 'The Noble' (I6507)
 
984 From Encyclopedia Britannica Online, article titled 'Blanche ofCastile:''French BLANCHE DE CASTILLE, Spanish BLANCA DE CASTILLA, wife ofLouisVIII of France, mother of Louis IX (St. Louis), and twice regentofFrance (1226-34, 1248-52), who by wars and marital alliances didmuchto secure and unify French territories. Blanche was the daughterofAlfonso VIII of Castile and Eleanor, who was the daughter of HenryIIof England. Her grandmother Eleanor of Aquitaine, queen of England,traveled to Spain to take the 11-year-old Blanche to France,where amarriage treaty was concluded with Louis, the young son ofKing Philip IIAugustus. This politically motivated marriage had beenarranged byBlanche's uncle, King John of England, and was celebratedin 1200 atPortsmouth, Hampshire. It represented only a brief truce inthe strugglebetween England and France for control over certainFrench territories.'Blanche, who became French through marriage, was gradually tobecomeFrench in spirit as well. Although she did not cease to beconcernedfor her family, among them her uncle John and his allies,herbrother-in-law Ferrand of Portugal, and her cousin Otto ofBrunswick(later Holy Roman emperor Otto IV), she rejoiced at the Frenchvictoryover Otto and the English at Bouvines in 1214, marking the firststageof French unification, a goal for which she was constantly tostrive.In the same year, she gave birth to Louis, the future king ofFrance. Upon John of England'sdeath, Blanche boldly tried to seize theEnglish throne: in 1216 Louisof France invaded England on her behalf.The English stood firmagainst him, and John's nine-year-old son wasfinally crowned HenryIII. 'A devout Roman Catholic, Blanche soon becameinvolved in what shesincerely believed to be a holy war against theheretical Cathari, asect founded on the belief that good and evil hadtwo separatecreators, which was flourishing throughout southern France.Herhusband, who became Louis VIII in 1223, took part in a crusadeagainstthe Cathari but suffered a fatal attack of dysentery uponreturning tothe north of France in 1226. In accordance with herhusband's will,Blanche became both guardian of the 12-year-old Louis andregent ofFrance. She zealously pressed to have Louis crownedimmediately, andthe coronation took place at Reims three weeks afterLouis VIII'sdeath. 'Her most pressing problem was to deal with arebellion of the greatbarons, organized by Philip Hurepel, theillegitimate son of KingPhilip II Augustus, and supported by King HenryIII of England. In theface of such adversity, Blanche showed herself byturns a delicatediplomat, a clever negotiator, and a strong leader.Dressed in white,on a white palfrey draped in the same colour, she rodeinto battle atthe head of her troops. After an attempted abduction ofthe youngking, Blanche did not hesitate to replace rebel nobleassociates with commoners if she thought itnecessary. She also createdlocal militias. Blanche was gradually ableto subdue the revolt,establish a new truce with England, and, in1229, pacify the south ofFrance by signing the Treaty of Paris withRaymond VII, count ofToulouse. France then entered an era of domesticstability, which saw theconstruction of many cathedrals throughoutthe country. 'On only oneoccasion did Blanche fail to exhibit diplomatic conduct.In 1229 adispute between an innkeeper and some students took place inthe LatinQuarter in Paris. The police were summoned, and the studentswere beatenand thrown into the Seine; such intervention in the LatinQuarter,however, was contrary to the prerogatives granted to theuniversity, andthe faculty and students threatened to strike if theuniversity'sprivileges were not respected. Badly advised, Blancheheld firm, but theuniversity closed its doors, and the faculty andstudents left Paris forthe provinces and abroad. It was to take fouryears and the interventionof the pope before the university wouldreturn to Paris with newprerogatives, this time granted by Blancheherself. 'Although Louis IXcame of age on April 25, 1236, Blanche remained athis side as his mostloyal and steadfast supporter. She lacked tact,however, with regard toher son's private life. Although Blancheherself had selected Margaret ofProvence to be Louis's wife, shetreated Margaret with considerableseverity. In 1244, after Louisrecovered from a serious illness, he andhis wife, much againstBlanche's wishes, made a vow to go on a crusadeagainst the Muslims.They embarked in 1248, and once again the kingdomwas entrusted toBlanche. Informed of Louis's defeat at Al-Mansurah,Egypt, and hissubsequent imprisonment, Blanche herself went to seek hisransom andthat of the French army. She petitioned her parents, herallies, andthe pope for funds and supplies, but interest in the crusadehaddwindled. 'Although weakened by a heart ailment, Blanche did notneglect herobligations as a regent. Continuing to preside over councilmeetings,she signed laws and watched over the poor of Paris. When someof thepoor were mistreated by the cathedral chapter, she herself rode,asformerly, to open the gates to their prison. On her way to the Abbeyofthe Lys, one of her favourite retreats, Blanche suffered an attackof theheart ailment that was to take her life. She was returned tothe palaceof the Louvre, dressed in a nun's habit, and laid on a bedof hay. There,after begging forgiveness of all and having receivedthe last sacraments,she died. She was buried at Maubuisson Abbey andher heart taken to theAbbey of the Lys. Louis IX was in Jaffa when helearned of his mother'sdeath. The news distressed him greatly, for hewas aware that he had lostnot only an incomparable parent but alsothe strongest supporter of hiskingship.' DE CASTILLE, Blanche (I6510)
 
985 From Encyclopedia Britannica Online, article titled 'Ferdinand III:''canonized Feb. 4, 1671; feast day May 30' 'also called SAINT FERDINAND,Spanish SAN FERNANDO, king of Castilefrom 1217 to 1252 and of Leon from1230 to 1252 and conqueror of theMuslim cities of Câordoba (1236), Jaâen(1246), and Seville (1248).During his campaigns, Murcia submitted to hisson Alfonso (laterAlfonso X), and the Muslim kingdom of Granada becamehis vassal. 'Ferdinand was the son of Alfonso IX of Leon and Berenguela,daughterof Alfonso VIII of Castile. When born, he was the heir to Leon,buthis uncle, Henry I of Castile, died young, and his motherinheritedthe crown of Castile, which she conferred on him. His father,likemany Leonese, opposed the union, and Ferdinand found himself atwarwith him. By his will Alfonso IX tried to disinherit his son, butthewill was set aside, and Castile and Leon were permanently unitedin1230. 'Ferdinand married Beatrice of Swabia, daughter of the HolyRomanemperor, a title that Ferdinand's son Alfonso X was to claim.Hisconquest of Lower Andalusia was the result of the disintegrationofthe Almohad state. The Castilians and other conquerors occupiedthecities, driving out the Muslims and taking over vast estates.' Fernando III Alfonsez 'The Saint' (I6183)
 
986 From Encyclopedia Britannica Online, article titled 'Sancho I:' 'bynameSANCHO THE FOUNDER, OR THE POPULATOR, Portuguese SANCHO OFUNADOR, OR OPOVOADOR, second king of Portugal (1185-1211), son ofAfonso I. Sancho'sreign was marked by a resettlement of thedepopulated areas of hiscountry, by the establishment of new towns,and by the rebuilding offrontier strongholds and castles. Tofacilitate his plans, he encouragedforeign settlers and enlistedbishops, religious orders, and nobles inhis colonization projects,granting vast territories to the militaryorders (the Hospitalers, the Templars, the Orders ofCalatrava andSantiago). After an invasion by the Almohad prince AbuYusuf Ya'qubal-Mansur, Sancho used the help of a passing crusaderfleet to captureSilves from the Moors (1189), but lost it (1191) andother lands south ofthe Tagus River when al-Mansur again attacked.Sancho quarreled both withhis bishops and with Rome over the paymentof tribute.' PORTUGAL, Sancho I Martino of (I6538)
 
987 From Encyclopedia Britannica Online, article titled 'Sancho III:' 'bynameSANCHO THE DESIRED, Spanish SANCHO EL DESEADO, king of Castilefrom 1157to 1158, the elder son of the Spanish emperor Alfonso VII. 'His father'swill partitioned the realm between his two sons, SanchoIII receivingCastile and Ferdinand II receiving Leon. After amilitary show of force,Sancho was able to reaffirm by treaty thevassalage of Aragon and Navarrewon by his imperial father, but, afterreigning but one year and 11 days,he died.' King Sancho III of Castille (I6513)
 
988 From Encyclopedia Britannica Online, article titled Eleanor ofAquitaine:'also called ELEANOR OF GUYENNE, French âELâEONORE, ORALIâENOR,D'AQUITAINE, OR DEGUYENNE, queen consort of both Louis VII ofFrance(in 1137-52) and Henry II of England (in 1152-1204) and motherofRichard I the Lion-Heart and John of England. She was perhaps themostpowerful woman in 12th-century Europe. 'She died in 1204 at themonastery at Fontevrault, Anjou, where shehad retired after thecampaign at Mirebeau. Her contribution toEngland extended beyond herown lifetime; after the loss of Normandy(1204), it was her ownancestral lands and not the old Normanterritories that remained loyal toEngland. She has been misjudged bymany French historians who have notedonly her youthful frivolity,ignoring the tenacity, political wisdom, andenergy that characterizedthe years of her maturity. 'She was beautifuland just, imposing andmodest, humble and elegant'; and, as the nuns ofFontevrault wrote intheir necrology: a queen 'who surpassed almost allthe queens of theworld.'ELEANOR OF AQUITAINE (1122-1204) was one of themost importantrulers of Medieval Europe. Many noblewomen in the MiddleAges were well-educated. but Eleanor hadthe chance to use her educationat a time when European politics wasdominated by men. When she was justfifteen, Eleanor's father died, and she inheritedAquitaine. the largestkingdom in France. That same year she marriedKing Louis VII and becameQueen of France. Although still a teenager,Eleanor was an impressivefigure--beautiful, very well-educated, andfearlessly independent. WhenLouis went off on the Crusades, she went with him, travelingthousands ofmiles, much of it through hostile lands. But Eleanor and Louis had nomale heir, and tensions developed betweenthem. The Pope granted them adivorce when Eleanor was twenty-nine.Within months. Eleanor marriedHenry Plantagent, her ex-husband's mainrival. Two years later Henrybecame King of England--and Eleanor was aqueen again. However, Henrysoon fell in love with another woman, and Eleanor leftEngland to set upher own court in Aquitaine, which she still ruled.Troubadours from allover France flocked to her palace at Poitiers,where Eleanor acted aspatron of the arts. Many of the ideas ofchivalry that we associate withthe Middle Ages were developed inEleanor's court..------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Some say KingLewis carried her into the Holy Land, where shecarried herself not veryholily, but led a licentious life; and, whichis the worst kind oflicentiousness, in carnal familiarity with aTurk. Eleanore (I6492)
 
989 From Encylcopedia Britannica Online article titled: 'DermotMacmurrough:''Irish Diarmaid Macmurchada...Irish king of Leinster whose appeal totheEnglish for help in settling an internal dispute led to theAnglo-Normaninvasion and conquest of Ireland by England. 'After succeeding to thethrone of his father, Enna, in 1126, Dermotfaced a number of rivals whodisputed his claim to the kingship. Heestablished his authority bykilling or blinding 17 rebel chieftainsof northern Leinster in 1141. In1153 he abducted the wife of TiernanO'Ruark, king of Breifne (moderncounties of Leitrim and Cavan). 'A bitter feud ensued, and in 1166Dermot was driven from Ireland.King Henry II of England then granted theexiled ruler permission toenlist the aid of several Anglo-Norman lordsof south Wales, notablyRichard de Clare, 2nd earl of Pembroke. Returningto Leinster in 1167with an advance party of Anglo-Normans, Dermotestablished a footholdthere. Pembroke arrived in August 1170, and Dermotthen helped theinvaders capture Dublin. Dermot married his daughter Evato Pembroke,and at Dermot's death Pembroke succeeded as ruler ofLeinster.' MACMURROUGH, King Diarmat , Of Leinster (I6569)
 
990 from England with his two brothers. BRAGDON, Benoni (I952)
 
991 From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):

"Kelea (w) remarried, to Kalamakua (k), chief of Halawa. Born was Laielohelohe (w), who pi'o married Piilani (k). Born was Lonoapiilani (k), killed by Kiha in battle. Born was Kihaapiilani (k). King of Maui. Born was Piikeaapiilani (w), wife of Umi, chief of Hawaii."

"Piikea of Maui, daughter of King Piilani of Maui and Queen Laielohelohe."

"Piikea (w) married King Umi; born were Aihakoko and Kumalaenuiaumi."

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Piikea is the name used by S.M. Kamakau.
Piikeaapiilani is the name used by SLK Peleioholani in his Robinson Family genealogy. 
PIIKEA-A-PIILANI, (Piikea, Piikea-a-Piilani) (Piikea, Piikea-a-Piilani) (I41011)
 
992 From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):

Look at Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), the own sister of Kawao Kaohele (k), the chiefly king surrounding Maui until Piilani (k).
1. Here are the ancestors - Kawaokaohele (k), King of Maui.
2. Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), Queen of Maui.
3. Piilani (k), King of Maui.
4. Kihaapiilani (k). King of Maui.
5. Kamalalawalu (k). King of Maui.
6. Kauhiakama (k), King of Maui.
7. Kaianikaumakaowakea (k), King of Maui.
8. Lonohonuakini (k). King of Maui.
9. Kaulahea (k) II, King of Maui.
10. Kekaulikekalanikuihonoikamoku (k). King of Maui.
11. Kamehamehanui (k). King of Maui.

Look at Kaulahea (k). King of Maui. Kaulahea (k) niaupio married Kalaniomaiheuila (w), his own sister; and born was Kalanikahimakaialii (w), wife of Kualii (k) of Oahu. Kalanikahimakaialii (w) married Kualii (k) of Oahu and had Kapiioho (k) Peleioholani I (k) Kukuiaimakalani (w). Look at this the mother of these Oahu chiefs is a Mauian and part Kauai and Oahu; also Kualii is King of Oahu.


Kalanikauleleiaiwi (w) married Kaulahea, King of Maui and was born to them Kekuiapoiwanui (w). 
KAULAHEA II (KAULAHEANUIOKAMOKU II), (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Maui) (Mo'i, Ruling Chief of Maui) (I40785)
 
993 From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):

Look at the children of Kaianikauleleiaiwi: (1) Child No. 1, Kekuiapoiwanui I (w); (2) Kekelaokekeaokalani (w); (3) Kalanikeeaumoku (k); (4) Alapainui (k), King of Hawaii, ancestor of L. M. Kekupuohikapulikoliko and many other offsprings; (5) Haae (k); (6) Keawepoepoe (k).

Kalanikauleleiaiwi (w) married again, to Kauauanuiamahiololi (k); born was Alapainui, King of Hawaii, ancestor of Kekaaniau, chiefess, L. M. Kekupuohikapulikoliko, Sam Parker and his sister Mary Stillman, and Kameeualani Kauanoe; and Haae, Alapai's younger brother, was also born of this union. 
HA'AE (HAAE-O-KALANI, HAAEOKALANI, HA'AE-A-MAHI) (I40993)
 
994 From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):

Look at the children of Kaianikauleleiaiwi: (1) Child No. 1, Kekuiapoiwanui I (w); (2) Kekelaokekeaokalani (w); (3) Kalanikeeaumoku (k); (4) Alapainui (k), King of Hawaii, ancestor of L. M. Kekupuohikapulikoliko and many other offsprings; (5) Haae (k); (6) Keawepoepoe (k).

Kalanikauleleiaiwi (w) married Kaulahea, King of Maui and was born to them Kekuiapoiwanui (w).

Kalanikauleleiaiwi (w) married again, to Keawe (k), King of Hawaii, and were born Kekelakekeaokaiani (w) and Kaianikeaumoku (k).

Kalanikauleleiaiwi (w) married again, to Kauauanuiamahiololi (k); born was Alapainui, King of Hawaii, ancestor of Kekaaniau, chiefess, L. M. Kekupuohikapulikoliko, Sam Parker and his sister Mary Stillman, and Kameeualani Kauanoe; and Haae, Alapai's younger brother, was also born of this union.

Kalanikauleleiaiwi (w) married again, to Lonoikahaupu (k), King of Kauai; born was Keawepoepoe (k), chief of Hawaii, Maui, Oahu, and Kauai, and it is understood through this marriage of Kalanikauleleiaiwi to Lonoikahaupu (k), King of Kauai, Keawepoepoe received the prostrating kapu of Pihenakalani, and it was through this marriage that the chiefs of Hawaii received the prostrating tabu. 
KALANIKAULELEIAWI (KALANIKAULELEIAWI I), (Queen of Hawai'i Island) (Queen of Hawai'i Island) (I40788)
 
995 From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):

Ululani married again, to Keaweaheulu (k), chief of Waianae, Oahu, through his grandmother Umiulaikaahumanu's marriage to Kuanuuanu (k) of Waianae, Oahu, and Heulu father of Keaweaheulu (k); by this marriage were born the high chiefly children Naihenui (k) Keouakeahohiwa (w),

Look at the chief Kalaniopuu (k), he is the own grandson of Umiulaikaahumanu (w) (true chiefly class) and Kuanuuanu (k) of Waianae, Oahu. Look closely at Kalaninuiiamamao, the own father of Kalaniopuu (k). A high chief. And here are the chiefly descendants that are seen in the broad daylight. 
UMIULAIKAAHUMANU ('UMI-'ULA-A-KA'AHA-MANU) (I40861)
 
996 From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Kalaniopuu (k), King of Hawaii, married Kanekapolei; born were two sons Keouakuahuula (k) and Keouapeeale (k); Keouakuahuula (k) married Kaiolaniokaiwalani (w), the only child of Anahulukapoiawohilani (k), a kapu high chief and the chiefly Lord of Kohala, Hawaii; born was the chiefess Wailuanuiahoano (w), grandmother of L. M. Kekupuohikapulikoliko and Mark P. Robinson and his sisters. 
WAILUANUIAHOANO (WAILUA) (I41588)
 
997 From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Kamahana (w) and Kapukini (w), through them are the chiefs of lao and they being the chiefly parents of Morris Kahai and his family. 
KAPUKINI (KAPUKINI III, KAPU-KINI-AKUA) (I41059)
 
998 From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Look at Kaulahea (k). King of Maui. Kaulahea (k) niaupio married Kalaniomaiheuila (w), his own sister; and born was Kalanikahimakaialii (w), wife of Kualii (k) of Oahu. Kalanikahimakaialii (w) married Kualii (k) of Oahu and had Kapiioho (k) Peleioholani I (k) Kukuiaimakalani (w). Look at this the mother of these Oahu chiefs is a Mauian and part Kauai and Oahu; also Kualii is King of Oahu.

Look at Peleioholani I (k); he is the grandparent of Kalaniomaiheuila Peleioholani. 
PELEIOHOLANI (PELEIOHOLANI I), (King, Ruling Chief of O'ahu) (King, Ruling Chief of O'ahu) (I40695)
 
999 From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Look at Keakahiwaakama (w) who married Kuhinahinau (k), konohiki chief of Kawaihae, Hawaii.
Born was Kekaikuihala (w) who married Kalanikaumakaowakea (k), King of Maui.
Born was Kamaikahuakai (k), the chief of east Maui.
Born was Nakaiokeakakaiuli (k), the chief of east Maui.
These two chiefs, the chiefly ancestors seen above, they were responsible for hiding Keliimaikai, namely Kalanimalokuloku, the younger brother of Kamehameha (the governor) of Kamehameha who ruled east Maui and fled in battle and barely escaped.

Look at Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), the own sister of Kawao Kaohele (k), the chiefly king surrounding Maui until Piilani (k).
1. Here are the ancestors - Kawaokaohele (k), King of Maui.
2. Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), Queen of Maui.
3. Piilani (k), King of Maui.
4. Kihaapiilani (k). King of Maui.
5. Kamalalawalu (k). King of Maui.
6. Kauhiakama (k), King of Maui.
7. Kalanikaumakaowakea (k), King of Maui.
8. Lonohonuakini (k). King of Maui.
9. Kaulahea (k) II, King of Maui.
10. Kekaulikekalanikuihonoikamoku (k). King of Maui.
11. Kamehamehanui (k). King of Maui.
12. Kahekili (k), last King of Maui.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kalanikaumaka-o-Wakea is the form of the name used by S.M. Kamakau. 
KALANIKAUMAKA-O-WAKEA (KALANIKAUMAKAOWAKEA I), (Moi, Ruler of Maui) (Moi, Ruler of Maui) (I41090)
 
1000 From genealogist Solomon Lehuanui Kalaniomaiheilu Peleioholani (in Ancestry of John Liwai Ena):
Look at Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), the own sister of Kawao Kaohele (k), the chiefly king surrounding Maui until Piilani (k).
1. Here are the ancestors - Kawaokaohele (k), King of Maui.
2. Keleanohoanaapiapi (w), Queen of Maui.
3. Piilani (k), King of Maui.
4. Kihaapiilani (k). King of Maui.
5. Kamalalawalu (k). King of Maui.
6. Kauhiakama (k), King of Maui.
7. Kaianikaumakaowakea (k), King of Maui.
8. Lonohonuakini (k). King of Maui.
9. Kaulahea (k) II, King of Maui.
10. Kekaulikekalanikuihonoikamoku (k). King of Maui.
11. Kamehamehanui (k). King of Maui.
12. Kahekili (k), last King of Maui. 
LONOHONUAKINI, (Ruling Chief, King of Maui) (Ruling Chief, King of Maui) (I40787)
 

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